Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Reader Challenge!

Busy, busy, busy.  Instead of doing the next chemistry post, I'm going to embrace my laziness and instead do a...

READER CHALLENGE!

Okay.  It's not that exciting.  It may not even be challenging.  It's certainly not strenuous.  But the point is that it's supposed to distract you, my beloved readers, from my lack of effort today.  Please ignore the previous sentence. 

So here it is, something to flex your brain over: a philosophical feat too lofty for Voltaire, too enigmatic for Descartes, too circular for Socrates.  You could probably encounter it as a warm-up exercise in a creative writing class:

"Describe the flavor of salt."

That's it.  Go.  Assume you're describing salt to someone who's never tasted it before (heathens), so that you can't just say, "It tastes salty" (Mmmm, how succinct)...

Perhaps at some point, if I'm feeling particularly cerebral, I'll revisit the topic from a philosophical perspective.  "What are the consequences of asking such a question?  Do we acknowledge the limitations of language as a communicative form?"  OH, THE SUPERCILIOUSNESS.

Begin!

21 comments:

  1. my brain is full of fuck!

    it taste like when I lick my lips when they are dry

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  2. I don't think that anyone wants to eat salt. It enhances the flavor of the food.
    Salt per se tastes salty, no other way to describe it. Sea water but dry hahahaha i don't know. It's kinda dry. Tastes like sweat, i really don't know.

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  3. Like heaven.
    Like eloquence.
    Like the missing link, that which makes the dinner plate once and for all come full circle.

    THIS IS SERIOUS BUSINESS OKAY.

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  4. Salt tastes like any of numerous compounds that result from replacement of part or all of the acid hydrogen by a metal or a group acting like a metal. Directly on the tongue, salt tastes biting and puckery. In your eye or on a broken skin part it can sting fiercely. On french fries or popcorn it increases the existing taste. On watermelon in the right amounts it makes the melon taste sweeter.

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  5. It kind of burns. But in a pleasant way.

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  6. What. I'm going to have to try this melon thing.

    (And thank you, Ms. Rambler, for sharing my passion! Salt is poetry.)

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  7. tastes like the oposite of sweet, like an oposite version of sugar

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  8. the flavour of salt. = salty.

    xD

    Or it tastes like well.. its a flavour of its own. none like it.

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  9. Open your mouth and pretend you are shaking a salt-shaker on your tongue. That's what salt tastes like! (Go on, try it, you know you want to!) +1

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  10. But salt is a flavor in itself? You can't describe that!

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  11. I'm going with some of the others and will say it tastes like a "nice post"

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to prove that you're worth your salt.